Duke "Pay to Play" Scandal

I just read this newly published article and thought it was a great summery to fully understand what is actually happening in the current legal case. Before reading this I was kind of lost.

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Beyond belief the house and cars given to his parents and no attempt to even hide it.

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“The motion by Ford’s attorneys included property records and real estate listings that they say show that after Williamson signed with Duke, his parents moved from a home in South Carolina with an advertised monthly rent of $895 to a home in Durham, North Carolina, with a listed monthly rent of $4,495.”

Nobody more than quadruples their monthly rent payments without something significant happening in life. I would think there seems to be plenty of evidence to warrant the NCAA to open a detailed investigation into this? Or is that already happening… Am I missing something?

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The AD at Oklahoma State, Mike Holder had this to say.

“If this is what happens when there is no competitive advantage gained, then the NCAA has created an expectation of significantly harsher penalty when a competitive is involved,” said coach Holder. “All of us that are members of the NCAA, will be watching to see if these standards and expectations are applied consistently.”

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“The penalties are the result of a Level I violation involving former associate head coach Lamont Evans, who was sentenced in June 2019 to three months in prison for accepting between $18,150 and $22,000 in bribes to steer players from South Carolina and Oklahoma State to certain agents and financial advisers.”

So there really was zero competitive advantage given to Oklahoma State for this assistants misconduct and a one year ban and 3 scholarships lost is what they were penalized with. Curious if getting a Zion Williamson commitment at any cost gives a team a competitive advantage, and what type of penalty should be enforced.

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I think the interesting question is does Coach K bow out if this investigation picks up steam? He doesn’t need to go through the stress of an investigation or the annoyance of serving a penalty. I could see him just calling it quites

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@BDragon The ncaa wont investigate and what college basketball writer has the balls to ask K about this? This confirms what everyone suspected but there won’t be any punishment for it.

I’d bet money you’re correct. The NCAA doesn’t attack blue bloods they make examples out of Okie St. But leave the UNCs and Dukes alone.

But i still think the question is worth asking IF this gains any steam does Coach K stick around. And I say no he doesnt.

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The Carona leaves him a nice excuse to exit gracefully without admitting that he’s a cheating cheater.

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Yup I feel like history shows us tht coaches in similar position slip out the side door when stuff like this goes down. It would also be a good indicator at how serious an the talk of an investigation is if Coach K decided to resign rather than see it out

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How is it even possible that the NCAA can operate so openly with such double standards and get away with it? At what point can the NCAA itself get into legal trouble? There’s got to be some wealthy basketball fan out there or organization looking to burn a few million(Play money im sure) on cleaning this situation up. Heck If I was rich I’d definitely look into it!

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It’s the joy of being a monopoly. There’s no other alternatives. And there are more multi-billionaires who profit from the NCAA than there are ones who want to blow money trying to tear it down.

It reminds me of a conversation I had with a guy several years ago and asked why doesn’t he purchase USA Rugby and turn around the organization. And the reply I got was, I don’t make losing investments. The lesson being, that despite being a major fan, supporter and contributor he wasn’t going to throw away his money over a project which basically amounts to a vanity project.

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haha, makes sense. Maybe also the NCAA is legally allowed to govern their basketball league with double standards and allow corrupt dealings to take place if they see it as a benefit to their bottom line…

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True. They aren’t breaking any laws. If you wanted to attack them on a legal matter, it would be not paying players, and we’ve seen that go to court. They way I see it is there are two options to break it, 1)someone comes in an starts a new league and then convinces schools to enter. 2) one or more schools ban together and decide to go their own way. (I think this is the most likely outcome).

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Well Im hoping the NCAA will at least look into the matter. They did for Kansas, so why not Duke. Both are darling programs. Perhaps the Kansas situation is a lot different…I actually am not up to date on that matter.

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One can hope. I’m by far not an expert on either situation and rarely read the news on either situation. But it would nice to see there at least be the project of action taking place.

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Here is a good write up of all the programs that likely will be facing some penalties.

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No mention of Duke. But it does seem the NCAA is going after fellow Blue Blood Kansas and in state completion NC State. After seeing the programs that are under KNOWN investigation, for me its kind of hard to believe that the NCAA is not looking into the allegations against Duke and the obvious circumstantial evidence available. Im no lawyer or investigator, but maybe a case against Duke at this point could be more difficult to prove and that is why their name is not being mentioned. I assume the NCAA can not just look into the bank accounts of Zion’s parents to dig up proof for a corruption case. With many of the other basketball programs, the FBI was doing their own corruption investigations and were able to uncover recordings and other evidence that the NCAA is able to use as proof for penalties. Therefor in Dukes case, the circumstantial evidence is there, but I have a feeling the NCAA doesnt have the tools or legal power like the FBI to access bank accounts, confiscate hard drives, etc. This is all my own conjecture and trying to work out this Duke corruption paradox in my head.

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I saw this article yesterday, and someone on Twitter linked o the judge’s bio that he went to law school at Duke. Not sure if it was accurate, but :woman_shrugging:

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